Saturday, 27 September 2014

Priestly Ordinations 2014 : 10

Dalmatic
Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for Ordinands. Happily, this year has been no exception : indeed the number of requests for such vestments has been more than double previous years.

This post concerns Father Carlos Velasquez, of the Diocese of Brooklyn (New York, USA), who was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood by the Most Rev'd Nicholas DiMarzio in the Co-Cathedral of Saint Joseph, Brooklyn on 28th June.

Father Velasquez commissioned vestments made in the Borromeon form for his First Holy Mass. The chasuble was made from a beautiful silk damask in crimson red and was ornamented with a damask in the colours of burgundy and gold, outlined with narrow braids, in the Roman style. The chasuble was identical with another made at the same time by the Studio.

Two matching dalmatics were also made (shewn in the above photograph). The vestments were lined in a bronze-coloured taffeta.

Please pray for Father Velasquez and for all newly-ordained priests.

Please click on the images for an enlarged view.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com



Father Velasquez shewn incensing the altar during the celebration
of his First Holy Mass in S' Joseph's Brooklyn.
Image kindly supplied by Father Frank Lona.


During the First Holy Mass of Father Velasquez
Image kindly supplied by Father Velasquez. 


Presbyterium of the Co-Cathedral of Saint Joseph, Brooklyn NY.


During the Ordination Mass of Father Velasquez.





Friday, 26 September 2014

Enquiries with the Studio

Each day, the Studio receives a significant number of e-mail enquiries about vestments and related matters. It is not possible for these messages to receive immediate attention.

In this age, we are accustomed to instantaneous responses to e-mails, tweets, Facebook posts etc. Perhaps unsurprisingly, this ethos is not entirely embraced by The Saint Bede Studio.

Every message received here is answered, but sometimes this can take 7 - 10 days. Your kind patience is appreciated.

Thursday, 18 September 2014

Priestly Ordinations 2014 : 9

Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for Ordinands. Happily, this year has been no exception : indeed the number of requests for such vestments has been more than double previous years.

This post concerns Father Christopher Barkhausen, of the Diocese of Paterson (New Jersey, USA), who was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood by the Most Rev'd Arthur Serratelli in the Church of Saint Philip the Apostle, Clifton (USA) on 24th May.

Father Barkhausen commissioned vestments made in the Borromeon form for his First Holy Mass. The chasuble (shewn in adjacent photographs) was made from a beautiful silk damask in muted gold and was ornamented with a damask in the colours of burgundy and gold, outlined with narrow braids, in the Roman style. The vestments were lined in burgundy taffeta.

Please pray for Father Barkhausen and for all newly-ordained priests.

Please click on the images for an enlarged view.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com

Father Barkhausen offering his First Holy Mass
Image kindly supplied by Father Barkhausen.

Friday, 29 August 2014

Priestly Ordinations 2014 : 8

conical chasuble
Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for Ordinands. Happily, this year has been no exception : indeed the number of requests for such vestments has been more than double previous years.

This post concerns Father Daniel Gill, of the Diocese of Kansas City - Saint Joseph (Missouri, USA), who was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood by the Most Rev'd Robert Finn in the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Kansas City on 24th May.

Father Gill commissioned a chasuble for his First Holy Mass in the semi-conical form. The chasuble (shewn adjacent) was made from a beautiful silk damask in ivory and was ornamented with a chevron made from straw-coloured damask, outlined with a narrow braid, in colours of royal blue, red and gold. The vestments were lined in straw-coloured taffeta.

Please pray for Father Gill and for all newly-ordained priests.

Please click on the images for an enlarged view.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com


Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception Kansas City.


At the Ordination of Father Daniel Gill.


Father Gill incensing the altar during the celebration
of his first Holy Mass.
Image kindly supplied by Father Gill.

Saturday, 23 August 2014

Priestly Ordinations 2014 : 7

Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for Ordinands. Happily, this year has been no exception : indeed the number of requests for such vestments has been more than double previous years.

In this post we describe vestments made for  Father Derek Hyett of the Archdiocese of Westminster (UK), who was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood by Cardinal Nichols in the Cathedral of the Most Precious Blood, Westminster on 28th June.

Father Hyett commissioned vestments made in the Gothic Revival form for his First Holy Mass. The chasuble (shewn in adjacent photographs) was made from an ecclesiastical brocade in a shade of crimson red. The vestments were lined in royal blue cotton.

The orphrey braid used to ornament these vestments is one of several which have been especially designed by the Saint Bede Studio. A Pugin chasuble in the collection of Saint Chad's Cathedral, Birmingham, was the basis for the design of this braid.

Please pray for Father Hyett and for all newly-ordained priests.

We are pleased also to include some photographs of Father Hyett's Ordination, found at the website of the Archdiocese of Westminster.

Please click on the images for an enlarged view.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com


The Admonition to the Ordinands

The Ordinands laying upon the nave floor during the Litany of the Saints.



Father Hyett during the Anointing.


Father Hyett shewn centre during the Canon of the Mass.


Cardinal Nichols giving the Blessing.

Thursday, 21 August 2014

Centenary of the Death of Pope Saint Pius X

Pope Saint Pius X (1903-1914)
On 4th August, 1903, Giuseppe Sarto, Cardinal-Patriarch of Venice, was unexpectedly elected Pope by the College of Cardinals and took the name Pius X.  

Pope Pius X died 100 years ago on 20th August, 1914, shortly after the outbreak of World War One, at the age of 79.  Of renowned sanctity, his cult grew-up immediately after his death and his successor, Pope Pius XII, Canonised him in 1954.

Click on the images for an enlarged view.



An unusual photograph:
the portrait shewn at the top of this post in the process of being painted.
Pope Pius is depicted working at his desk.



Pope Pius walking in the Vatican.



Pope Pius walking through the Vatican.


Papal Mass being celebrated in the Sistine Chapel by Pope Pius X in 1908.
This Mass commemorated the Golden Jubilee of the Pope's Ordination.
The Pope is depicted here wearing a special form of cassock
used on Solemn Liturgical occasions which has a train.



A wonderful portrait of Pope Pius.



The mortal remains of Pope Pius lying-in-state August, 1914.



The scene in S' Peter's in 1954 during the Canonisation of Pius X.
The remains of Saint Pius are enclosed in a glass casket set before the High altar
shewn on the left of this photograph.

Friday, 15 August 2014

Revision of the Rites : The Kiss of Peace

At the last Synod of Bishops, Pope Benedict and other bishops posed a question about the Kiss of Peace or Pax in the celebration of the Ordinary Form of Mass according to the Roman Rite. As is well-known by now, the Congregation for Divine Worship and Discipline of the Sacraments recently issued a decision of admirable Roman liturgical conservatism, rejecting a proposal that the Pax be observed at the Offertory, rather than before the reception of Holy Communion (as it has been since the time of Pope Saint Gregory the Great). We need not detail that decision: a report about it may be read at the Catholic News Service.

In a previous post about the revision of the Rites, we pondered if celebrants might consider that any ritual actions of the Extraordinary Form could be incorporated into their celebration of the New Mass in such a way as would not disturb the Faithful. One of these, it might be suggested, is the Pax.

The ritual actions for the Pax in the Extraordinary and Ordinary forms of the Roman Rite are quite different. The prayers - which are the same in both Old and New - are rearranged in the Ordinary form. One thing remains unchanged, however, and it is most significant. Domine Jesu Christi, qui dixisti apostolis tuis ... This prayer, which is the preface to the Pax, is not addressed to God the Father (as all the other prayers of the Mass are) *   but addressed directly to God the Son, who is present upon the altar before the very eyes of the celebrant.

All the more inappropriate, therefore, for the celebrant to say or sing this prayer looking around at the Congregation (we need not elaborate on various manifestations of the ars celebrandi of some priests). The celebrant ought to have his eyes cast down upon the altar, looking at Him whom he is addressing. This injunction, however, will not be found in the rubrics of the Pauline Missal.

The Kissing of the Altar :
Karsh's photograph from the famous book by
Bishop Fulton Sheen : This is the Mass.
There is a regrettable ritual excision from the Pax as observed in the Pauline Missal. In Solemn Masses, according to the Extraordinary form, the celebrant recites quietly the prayer Domine Jesu Christi, qui dixisti apostolis tuis and then he kisses the corporal upon which rest the Sacred Host and the Chalice. The deacon (standing at his right), kisses the altar, but not the corporal. The celebrant then gives the Pax to the deacon. In some Mediaeval Western liturgies, the celebrant kissed not the corporal, but the Sacred Host itself, or the foot of the Chalice. These ritual gestures are of great significance and underline that the Pax is not a greeting per se, but a ritual transmission of the Peace which comes directly from our Saviour.

Would it be so objectionable if celebrants of Mass in the Ordinary Form were once again to kiss the corporal before giving the Faithful the Greeting of Peace? Would that ritual action not emphasise their words : The Peace of the Lord be with you always ? Would this be so objectionable? For some, probably. Others might not even notice. Still others might welcome the enrichment of an other-worldly ritual dimension in the Ordinary Form of the Mass. Prudence in all things.

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* With the exception of the Kyrie eleison, which is a litany.