Monday, 29 June 2015

Priestly Ordinations 2015 : 4

Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for priestly Ordinands. Happily, this year has been no exception.

This post concerns Father John-Paul Mount of the Archdiocese of Melbourne (Australia), who was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood in the Cathedral Church of Saint Patrick, Melbourne on 27th June along with two other candidates.

Father Mount commissioned vestments from the Studio in the Saint Giles style, but wished particular Marian overtones. The chasuble (shewn adjacent) unique in its design, was sewn from an Italian lampas in silver, straw and taupe and was ornamented with an orphrey in blue with medallions in applique-work. A galloon based on the work of AWN Pugin outlined this orphrey. The vestments were lined in a blue silk taffeta of a shade common in the mediaeval period.

Please pray for Father Mount and for all newly-ordained priests.

This post will be updated with further photographs of Father Mount's Ordination.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com


Sunday, 28 June 2015

Archdiocese of Melbourne Ordinations

Father John-Paul Mount (left) and Father Francis Denton
after their Ordinations in Saint Patrick's Cathedral Melbourne.
With them is a fellow-ordinand Father Charles Balnaves
wearing a chasuble not made by the Saint Bede Studio.
Image: Casamento Photography/Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne
The Saint Bede Studio took special delight in Ordinations held yesterday, 27th June, in Saint Patrick's Cathedral Melbourne. Two of our esteemed customers were ordained priests yesterday, vested in chasubles made by the Studio.

The Rev'd John-Paul Mount and the Rev'd Francis Denton were ordained by the Archbishop of Melbourne, the Most Rev'd Denis Hart. An account of the Ordinations may be read here.

A description of each of the vestments will be given in separate posts.

Please pray for Fathers Mount and Denton and all newly-ordained priests.

Thursday, 25 June 2015

2016 Ordinands

This is a most important notice for those considering commissions vestments from the Studio for Priestly Ordination in 2016. A very limited number of places are available which will be given on a "first come, first served" basis.

If you are considering vestments, or know someone who is, now is the time to approach us, even if dates and details of designs are worked out down the track.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com

Sunday, 21 June 2015

Priestly Ordinations 2015 : 3

Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for priestly Ordinands. Happily, this year has been no exception.

This post concerns Father Thomas McKenzie of the Archdiocese of Saint Paul and Minneapolis (USA), who was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood in the Cathedral Church of Saint Paul, Minnesota on 30th May along with seven other candidates.

Father McKenzie commissioned vestments from the Studio in the Saint Giles style. The chasuble (shewn adjacent), was sewn from an ivory and straw-coloured ecclesiastical brocade and was ornamented with an orphrey in green, gold and red : a unique design of the Saint Bede Studio, based on the work of AWN Pugin. The vestments were lined in straw-gold taffeta.

Please pray for Father McKenzie and for all newly-ordained priests.


Father McKenzie during the celebration of his First Holy Mass
in the Cathedral of Saint Paul, Minnesota.
Image: dammelphoto.com


Father McKenzie during the celebration of his First Holy Mass
in the Cathedral of Saint Paul, Minnesota.
Image: dammelphoto.com


Magnificent apse of the Cathedral of Saint Paul Minnesota.
Note the splendid civory or baldacchino surmounting the altar.



Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com

Please click on the images for an enlarged view.


Monday, 15 June 2015

Lord, to whom shall we turn ?
Revisited by Cardinal Sarah

Some thoughts on “presidency” and posture for prayer

Although there is a great deal of discussion now and a body of scholarship concerning the revival of the celebration of the Roman Rite Mass ad orientem, it is found that this discussion is almost entirely limited to the Liturgy of the Eucharist in the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite. Yet, the principle concerns the orientation of Liturgical prayer throughout the entirety of the Mass. Amongst the many innovations introduced after the Council was a provision (Ritus Servandus 1965, no. 23) for the celebrant to pray the Kyrie, Gloria, Collect and Creed at a sedilia, rather than at the altar (as had previously obtained). This provision, of course, is derived from the practice where a bishop celebrates Mass solemnly, either at the faldstool or at the throne. The 1965 provision was taken a step further with the introduction of the new Missal in 1970.

Much to the amazement of many, the Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship, Cardinal Sarah has recently spoken about this very matter in an interview reproduced in the L'Osservatore Romano and translated here. He has said :

Contrary to what has at times been sustained, and in conformity with the Conciliar Constitution , it is absolutely fitting that during the Penitential Rite, the singing of the Gloria, the orations and Eucharistic Prayer, for everyone – the priest and the congregation alike – to face ad orientem together, expressing their will to participate in the work of worship and redemption accomplished by Christ. This way of doing things could be fittingly carried out in the cathedrals where the liturgical life must be exemplary (n. 4).

Consequently, it is timely to republish here this article (with one or two modifications) which appeared on the blog The New Liturgical Movement in 2009.

Dom Emmanuel of the Benedictine Abbey of Le Barroux gave a paper to the 1997 CIEL Conference about this topic. In a comprehensive analysis, which discusses firstly the position of the celebrant during the Kyrie, Gloria, Collect and Creed and secondly, the celebrant during the readings from the Scripture, he reached this conclusion:
Do we find that the law in force until 1962 is universally attested in the history of the Roman Mass, or do we find that there are exceptions? Having finished our enquiry we may now answer this question: as far we can judge from the texts currently available, the Roman Mass, both according to the use of the [Roman] Curia and those of the dioceses and religious orders, show us that the simple priest is at the altar for the Gloria, the Collect and the Creed, and that this is the case until 1962. So the Ordo Missae of 1965 departs from the common (and almost universal) practice up to that point when it prescribes that the simple priest may carry out these functions at his seat. For the readings the celebrant goes to his chair near the altar. By having the celebrant positioned at the sedilia for the readings, the Ordo Missae of 1965 (and then that of 1970) do depart from what we know of Roman usage (taken as a whole) through the centuries.
Dom Emmanuel's study and of course many other works on liturgical history, reveal that in the early church (and we know that from archaeological evidence as well the ancient churches which still exist) the Cathedra of the bishop was mostly placed in the apse, behind the altar, with benches for the presbyters on either side. This was a position, as Dom Emmanuel concludes, which emphasised the jurisdiction of the Bishop. He argues, however, that it never was customary in the Western liturgy for the priest-celebrant to occupy such a position, because he did not have jurisdiction. Instead, as Dom Emmanuel discusses, the priest celebrant recited the Kyrie, Gloria and Collect at or near to the altar ad orientem. Similarly, a bishop who did not have jurisdiction occupied a seat on the right of the altar, but read those prayers from that position ad orientem (for example, the rites of Pontifical Mass at the faldstool according to the Extraordinary Form).

Leaving aside the issue of the priest-celebrant facing the people at the altar during the Liturgy of the Eucharist (for which there is some precedent in liturgical history which was used as the basis for the introduction of "Mass facing the people"), what we would like identify is that an entirely new concept has been introduced into the 1970 Mass, namely, the priest-celebrant as Presider. This seems nowhere more prominent in the New Order of Mass than in the Introductory Rite: the structure of which is an innovation in the history of the Western liturgy. Furthermore, this role of Presider is codified by the instruction on where the chair of the celebrant is to be placed within the sanctuary: namely at the head of the sanctuary in an apse; in short behind the altar (GIRM 271):
The chair of the celebrant should indicate his role of presiding over the assembly and of leading the prayers. Hence the most suitable position is at the head of the sanctuary facing the people, unless the construction of the building or other circumstances prevents this; for instance, if communication between the priest and the assembly of the faithful is made difficult because of too great a distance.
Both the position of the chair of the priest-celebrant (which emphasises "presidence") and the offering of prayers (facing the congregation) from that chair, instead of before the altar, represent a break with Liturgical Tradition. We would like to suggest that this particular break with Tradition has largely facilitated the widespread distortion where right from the beginning of the Liturgy the priest becomes more of a compere or emcee, rather than a celebrant.

What might be done, to recapture the Church's tradition at this point in the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite Mass? In many places, this has begun already to happen, where priests have felt uncomfortable with the prominence of their (often elevated) chairs, and have opted to place the chair at the side of the sanctuary in front of the altar, in the manner of sedilia. We have also read where some priests with chairs in the position just described, have turned slightly toward the altar (rather than toward the congregation) for the Penitential rite, Gloria and Collect. All of this would seem to be able to take place within the current framework of the Ordinary Form. It also does not exclude the celebrant giving a brief introduction to the Mass, but it might be hoped that this is quite distinct from the prayers of the Rite itself.

Perhaps, under the far-sighted guidance of Cardinal Sarah, a reform to re-instate the tradition might be introduced initially as an option for celebrants. Might it be something like the following? The celebrant might conduct the Penitential Rite ad orientem "at the foot of the altar", then go up to stand at the altar for the Kyrie, Gloria and Collect. Then he could go to the sedilia and sit down for the reading of the Scripture. He would bless the deacon (and incense, if it used) at the altar, not the sedilia. After the Gospel, he would return to the altar for the Creed and General Intercessions (both ad orientem). Note that these ceremonial adjustments might be used even if the Liturgy of the Eucharist continued to be celebrated versus populum (especially if the arrangement of central altar Cross and flanking candlesticks is observed). Might this be a gradual and pastorally-considerate way of reintroducing ad orientem to the entire Ordinary Form Roman Mass?


Please note that this article is Copyright and may not be reproduced in any electronic or paper-based media without the prior permission of the author.


Sunday, 14 June 2015

Priestly Ordinations 2015 : 2

Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for priestly Ordinands. Happily, this year has been no exception.

This post concerns Father Ian Van Heusen of the Diocese of Raleigh (North Carolina, USA), who was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood in Saint Patrick's Church Fayetteville on 6th June along with other candidates.

Father Van Heusen commissioned vestments from the Studio in the Saint Philip Neri form. The chasuble (shewn adjacent), was sewn from a green and gold coloured ecclesiastical brocade and was ornamented very simply in the Roman manner with outlining braids. The vestments were lined in green silk.

Please pray for Father Van Heusen and for all newly-ordained priests.

Father Van Heusen presented with the sacred vessels
during his Priestly Ordination.
Image: Catholic Diocese of Raleigh 


The interior of S' Patrick's Church, Fayetteville
during the Mass of Priestly Ordination.
Image: Catholic Diocese of Raleigh 


Please click on the image for an enlarged view.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com

Tuesday, 9 June 2015

Winter Begins

Here in the Southern Hemisphere, the Feast of Pentecost and the beginning of the Season of Winter coincided. Manifestations of the Holy Spirit can, it would seem, include a rush of cold air, which brought unwelcome maladies to the Saint Bede Studio.

Recently, a very large number of enquiries has been received by the Studio. Every enquiry will be answered, but the patience of all those who have contacted us is sought.

Monday, 1 June 2015

For the Season " Per Annum " 2015 : 2

Borromeon vestments
At the resumption of the time "per annum" we are pleased to present these attractive sets of green vestments.

A group of young priests of the Archdiocese of New York  commissioned the Studio to make a chasuble and dalmatic to present to the seminary from which they were ordained in 2014.  A dupion silk in a rich shade of olive green was chosen for the vestments.

The chasuble, in the Borromeon style, is ornamented with a rich brocade of burgundy and gold according to the Roman form, outlined with a galloon in the same colour. The dalmatic is decorated with clavi in the traditional manner. The vestments are lined with a wine red taffeta.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com


Borromeon vestments

Thursday, 28 May 2015

Could Discussion on Renewing the Sacred Liturgy be Improved?

Occasionally on this Blog, articles pertaining to the traditions and celebration of the Sacred Liturgy in both the Ordinary and Extraordinary forms of the Roman Rite appear. This was one of the intentions of establishing this Blog eight years ago.

One of the differences between the pre and post Vatican Council II Church is now most everyone has an opinion on the Sacred Liturgy. In a digital age, these opinions - for better or worse - can now be shared quickly and effectively. But being the loudest voice does not necessarily equate to the most prudent one.

Discussing "improving" the Sacred Liturgy of the Roman Rite is a sensitive issue and what is written ought not be presented in a manner which might cause confusion or scandal. A pious woman once gave me a reminder : it is better to pray about the reform of the Liturgy than to write articles about it. Probably both can be done, so long as the prayer informs the writing.

Wednesday, 27 May 2015

Priestly Ordinations 2015 : 1

Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for priestly Ordinands. Happily, this year has been no exception.

This post concerns Father Stephen Prisk of the Diocese of Paterson (New Jersey, USA), who was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood in the Church of Saint Philip the Apostle on 23rd May along with thirteen other candidates.

Vestments were commissioned as a gift for Father Prisk in the Borromeon form. The chasuble (shewn adjacent), was sewn from a white-coloured ecclesiastical brocade and was ornamented very simply in the Roman manner with a brocade in the colours of old gold and red. The vestments were lined in a saffron-coloured taffeta.

Please pray for Father Prisk and for all newly-ordained priests.

Please click on the image for an enlarged view.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com