Saturday, 7 July 2018

Priestly Ordinations : 3

The Saint Bede Studio
Figure 1 :
Ordination chasuble of Father Tran.
Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for priestly Ordinands.  Happily, 2018 is no exception.

In this post, we are pleased to draw attention to the ordination of Father Anh Tran of the Archdiocese of Seattle (USA).  Father Tran was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood in the Cathedral of Saint James on 9th June by the Archbishop of Seattle, the Most Rev'd Peter Sartain.

Father Tran commissioned a set of festal vestments from the Studio in the Borromeon style for his First Holy Mass. 

The vestments were made from a silk damask in a muted shade of gold and ornamented in the Roman manner in colours of old rose and bronze, outlined with a galloon of red and straw-gold.  The vestments were lined in deep red-coloured taffeta.

Please pray for Father Tran and for all newly-ordained priests.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com

Please click on the images for an enlarged view.


Figure 2 :
Ordination of Father Anh Tran
At the Laying-on of hands.
Image : www.nwcatholic.org

Saturday, 30 June 2018

Priestly Ordinations 2018 : 2

Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for priestly Ordinands.  Happily, 2018 is no exception.

In this post, we are pleased to draw attention to the ordination of Father Peter Saucedo of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles (USA).  Father Saucedo was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood in the Cathedral of our Lady of the Angels on 2nd June by the Archbishop, the Most Rev'd Jose Gomez.

Father Saucedo commissioned a set of festal vestments from the Studio in the Gothic Revival style for his First Holy Mass. 


The vestments were made from an English ecclesiastical brocade in a shade of ivory and ornamented with a braid in colours of red, burgundy and straw-gold of the Studio's own design. The vestments were lined in gold-coloured taffeta.

Please pray for Father Saucedo and for all newly-ordained priests.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com

Please click on the images for an enlarged view.

Monday, 25 June 2018

For Funeral Masses

Violet vestmentsRecently, the Studio completed a simple set of vestments for a returning customer in the United Kingdom.  Shewn in the adjacent photograph, the vestments are violet in colour, the design being deliberately austere and lacking any form of gold ornamentation.

The chasuble is ornamented with a column back and front, formed from a new Puginesque braid designed by the Studio, named Lux Aeterna, in colours of black and bronze.

This is the prototype for a new range of simple chasubles being made by the Studio specifically for Funeral Masses in the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite.

Variations on this design in colours of purple and violet will be exhibited on the Studio blog from time to time and will be available for purchase.

Click on the image for an enlarged view.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com

Tuesday, 19 June 2018

Orphrey Braids of the Saint Bede Studio

Each year, the Saint Bede Studio adds to its stable of orphrey braids.  Most of our braids are derived from precedents, either Gothic Revival or Mediaeval. They are never merely copies, but always have original touches to enhance the diversity of their use.

These unique braids are designed by the Studio and only used in conjunction with our vestments. They are not commercially available, nor available to any other vestment makers and are reserved under international copyright.

The braids shewn in the adjacent image are used for orphreys in both the Gothic and Roman * styles of vestments designed and made by the Studio.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
* The Studio's interpretation of the Roman style is represented by the Borromeon, Saint Martin and Saint Philip Neri chasubles.

Studio Newsletter

The Studio's Newsletter for June 2018 has now been published.

If you have not received a copy, although usually have done, it is because your e-mail address with us is no longer current.

New subscribers are most welcome.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com

Monday, 11 June 2018

The Studio Blog

Each day, the Saint Bede Studio receives enquiries from those seeking vestments from many parts of the world and often the first response is to direct the enquirer to the Studio Blog.  The Blog has been designed to be as comprehensive as possible, within its limits.  It has been set up for viewing via a computer screen, tablet (or equivalent), but is not best navigated via a smartphone.

Frequently we are asked if the Studio has a catalogue.  The answer is here .

In the right-hand column (or sidebar) of each page of the Blog are helpful links for visitors.  Some of these are links to important pages detailing Studio policies, how to place an order &c.

Below that are links with images to pages describing the styles of vestments which are frequently enquired about.

After that is a list of links; mostly these refer to posts about vestments in the various liturgical colours and our styles.  These are a good guide to the range of materials and ornaments we use for our vestments and the best substitute for a catalogue we can offer.

The Studio quite deliberately does not have an online store because it is our policy to supply our vestments only to those in Communion (broadly speaking) with the See of Peter.  We cannot ensure this if purchases are made online.  Although this does limit our business, we feel that this is the best approach to our work.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com

Friday, 8 June 2018

To the Sacred Heart

A beautiful hymn, written in Australia in the late 1950s by Professor James McAuley, to music by Richard Connolly.  It became part of the Living Parish Hymnbook, first published in 1961.  A recording of this lovely hymn may be heard at this YouTube post

Antiphon : 
Jesus, in your heart we find
Love of the Father and mankind;
These two loves to us impart
Divine love in a human heart.
May we stand within the fire
Of your Sacred Heart, and raise
To our God in joyful choir
All creation's song of praise.  
In our hearts from roots of pride
Deadly growths of evil flower;
But from Jesus' wounded side
Streams the sacramental power. 
To the depths within your heart
Draw us with divine desire,
Hide us, heal us, and impart
Your own love's transforming fire.

Thursday, 7 June 2018

Fortescue on the Eighteenth Century

Father Adrian Fortescue
"In the eighteenth century a desolating wave of bad taste passed over Europe.  It gave us Baroc churches, tawdry gilding, vulgarities of gaudy ornament instead of fine construction.  It passed over clothes and gave us our mean, tight modern garments.  And it passed, alas! over vestments too, and gave us skimped, flat vestments of bad colour, outlined in that most impossible material, gold braid, instead of the ample, stately forms which had lasted until then....For these curtailed shapes are not the historic ones which came down hardly modified for so many centuries. They are a quite modern example of Baroc taste...Skimped chasubles, gold braid and lace are not Roman; they are eighteenth century bad taste."

So wrote one of the most illustrious ecclesiastical scholars of the early twentieth century, the Rev'd Dr Adrian Fortescue. This is an extract from a lecture which he gave to the Altar Society of Westminster Cathedral in 1912. Dr Fortescue's name is, unfortunately, better known for the ceremonial manual which he prepared in order to raise money for the building of his Parish church : The Ceremonies of the Roman Rite Described, which has run into many editions, over almost one century.

Dr Fortescue made these counter-cultural comments a century ago, but each new generation of Catholics has to be reminded of them.

Wednesday, 6 June 2018

A good Catholic maxim

Hilaire Belloc with GB Shaw (left) and GK Chesterton.

Wherever the Catholic sun doth shine, 
There’s always laughter and good red wine.
At least, I’ve always found it so;
Benedicamus Domino.
Hilaire Belloc (1870 - 1953).

Sunday, 3 June 2018

Penitential dalmatic

The Studio has recently completed a dalmatic for a young priest of the Diocese of Steubenville (Ohio), USA, a returning customer.

The vestments were made from a purple ecclesiastical brocade and lined in a deep red shade of taffeta. They are ornamented with a narrow braid in colours of Royal Blue, red, gold and white of the Studio's own design.

This dalmatic was made to match a chasuble set previously made for our customer.

Click on the image for an enlarged view.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com



Sunday, 27 May 2018

To the Most Holy Trinity

It is truly fitting and just, right and profitable for our salvation, always and everywhere to give thanks to you, Lord, holy Father, almighty, eternal God. With your only-begotten Son and the Holy Spirit, you are one God, one Lord, not in the singleness of one Person, but in a Trinity of one substance. For, whatever we believe through your revelation about your glory, the same also we believe about your Son and about the Holy Spirit, without distinction or difference. So that in acknowledging the true and eternal Godhead, we adore each individual person and, at the same time, their one substance and their equal majesty: which the Angels, the Archangels, the Cherubim and the Seraphim all praise, never ceasing to cry out with one voice:

Holy, holy, holy is the Lord God of mighty hosts! The heavens and earth are full of your glory. Hosanna in the highest. Bless'd is he who comes in the Lord's name. Hosanna in the highest.

This is the translation of the Preface of the Most Holy Trinity prepared by the Saint Bede Studio for the Order of Mass published by Ignatius Press.

The translation and illustration may not be reproduced without prior approval.

Wednesday, 23 May 2018

Priestly Ordinations 2018 : 1

Figure 1.
Father Moon pictured with seminarians
and ministers after the celebration of his
First Holy Mass.
Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for priestly Ordinands.  Happily, 2018 is no exception.

In this post, we are pleased to draw attention to the ordination of Father Maurice Moon of the Diocese of Fort Worth, Texas (USA).  Father Moon was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood in the Cathedral of Saint Patrick on 19th May by the Bishop of Fort Worth, the Most Rev'd Michael Olson.

Father Moon commissioned a set of festal vestments from the Studio in the Gothic Revival style for his First Holy Mass. 


The vestments were made from an English ecclesiastical brocade in a shade of red and ornamented with a braid in colours of red, burgundy and straw-gold of the Studio's own design. The vestments were lined in muted yellow taffeta.


Figure 2.
Vestments made for Father Moon.
Father Moon's First Holy Mass was celebrated in the beautiful parish Church of Saint Peter in Lindsay (Texas) on Pentecost Sunday.  Father Moon kindly sent us an image taken after the First Mass (above).  We are pleased to include below two other images of this church's interior and refer readers to this interesting article about this hidden gem, built at the end of the 19th century by the town's German Catholic community.

Please pray for Father Moon and for all newly-ordained priests.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com

Please click on the images for an enlarged view.








Figure 3.
Saint Peter's church Lindsay, TexasView looking east down the nave.



Figure 4.
Magnificent polychrome paint treatment of the walls
of Saint Peter's church, Lindsey, Texas.
This work is in the style of the 19th century
German Romanesque Revival.

Friday, 18 May 2018

Festal Dalmatic

Recently, the Saint Bede Studio completed a chasuble and dalmatic based on the style of the 16th century for a priest of the Diocese of Rockville Centre (New York state). In this post, we feature the dalmatic, which is made from ecclesiastical brocade and ornamented with a narrow galloon in the Roman style.

From the 16th century onward, the manner of decorating dalmatics changed from the earlier ornamental schemes. From earliest time until the present day, dalmatics have typically been decorated with two strips of ornament called clavus (plural clavi) running parallel to each other down the full length of the vestment.

From the 16th century, the clavi, which had been paired typically at a distance of approximately 30 cm (12 inches) or less, came to be separated much more widely. The apparels - being fabric ornaments which linked the two clavi together,  generally positioned below the neckline of the dalmatic - were also greatly enlarged in size; we might say disproportionately so. In subsequent centuries these ungainly apparels were abandoned and only their outlining galloons remained as the typical form of decoration of the Roman dalmatic.

This simple dalmatic has the widely-spaced clavi, with the apparel being indicated by an outlining braid.

Click on the image for an enlarged view.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com

Wednesday, 16 May 2018

Contrasts : 3

Solemn Mass in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite :
A European Parish Church.

Solemn Mass in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite :
Conventual Mass at the Abbey of Le Barroux, France.


Tuesday, 15 May 2018

The Notorious “Gala” :
Some Personal Reflections.

Ten years ago, I had the privilege of making vestments which were used by Pope Benedict at a Solemn Mass in Saint Mary’s Cathedral, Sydney, during World Youth Day 2008. Probably the most humbling moment of my life was when Pope Benedict walked past me in the sacristy wearing the vestments which I had made with my own hands. I feel certain that anyone reading that last sentence will readily understand these sentiments.

Over more than fifteen hundred years, countless others have had a similar privilege of making vestments for the Pope. Such vestments are not pageant costumes or fine clothes, they are sacred robes intended for the fitting worship of God. They are not intended to glorify the wearer but to draw all who look upon them into the Sacred Mysteries, raising hearts and minds to God. I like to believe that vestment-makers over so many centuries have had these sentiments in their hearts when sewing sacred vestments, just as I do in the 21st century.

As a maker of sacred vestments, and for the reasons outlined above, I have found the recent events of the Met Gala and the exhibition accompanying it, confronting and profoundly offensive. I will pass over without much comment - since so many others have, and more eruditely - the sacrilegious outfits worn by celebrities at the Met Gala, being parodies of sacred vestments. In this highly-sexualised age, need we doubt that the title of this exhibition at the Museum Heavenly Bodies is purposely ambiguous? Bit of a give-away isn’t it? How shameful to consider the vestments worn by popes for the celebration of the Sacred Liturgy of centuries past now being part of such an exhibition, intermingled with designer costumes for female bishops and popes.

Reading this post, please consider making Reparation for this blight on the sacred beauty of Holy Mother Church and that all Churchmen involved with it will regret such folly.

Michael Sternbeck
The Saint Bede Studio.

Friday, 11 May 2018

A Monastic Solemn Mass 1945

The Preparation of Incense.
The well-known ceremonial study of the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite The Celebration of Mass, prepared by Canon JB O'Connell (who also edited later editions of Fortescue's The Ceremonies of the Roman Rite Described), was first published in 1945 in three volumes. One volume, studying the ceremonies of Solemn Mass, featured a number of photographs taken in the Abbey Church of Prinknash, England.

Canon O'Connell, in the introduction to his book, gives an explanation:

By the very great kindness of the Right Reverend Wilfrid Upson OSB, Abbot of Prinknash Abbey, Gloucester (England), and the monks of his monastery, a number of photographs were taken in the (temporary) Abbey church to celebrate the chief ceremonies of High Mass.

The photographs, some of which are reproduced here, were taken by the Walwin Studio of Gloucester, probably in the year 1941. In the last several years, the Prinknash Community recently returned to residence in the original Abbey and the Chapel pictured in these photographs is once again the Abbey Church.

The Chanting of the Gospel.
The photographs are intended as a staged illustration of the ceremonies of Solemn Mass: obviously it was not an actual Mass which was photographed. The 1st photograph shews the preparation of incense at the beginning of Mass; the 2nd photograph shews the singing of the Gospel; the 3rd photograph shews the ablutions after Holy Communion and the 4th photograph shews the Blessing. Each of these photographs may be clicked on for an enlarged view.

A number of things may be commented upon. The first is the excellent architecture of this tiny chapel, illustrating that beautiful and proportionate things can be created in confined spaces. Especially noteworthy are the tasteful statue niches and the blind arcading and tracery around the walls of the sanctuary.

The Ablutions after Holy Communion.
The second noteworthy thing is the vestments and paraments. The vestments are very ample, the chasuble being semi-conical, and are decorated in a mediaeval manner. Observe that the dalmatic and tunic are ornamented in a completely different manner from each other: a practice which, unfortunately, ceased to be commonplace from the Baroque era onward. Observe also that the chasuble is decorated exactly in the Roman manner: a massive "Tau" on the frontal of the chasuble and a simple column on the back. This style of ornament has been employed continuously in Rome for a millenium.

An interesting touch, and very monastic, is the modest scale of the candlesticks on the High altar. Lastly, it would be of interest to include these explanatory remarks by Canon O'Connell:

The Blessing.
By special privilege of the Holy See, the monks of Prinknash Abbey, though belonging to the Subiaco Congregation of the Benedictine Order, wear a white habit. The tonsure of these Religious is the same as that in use in the Carthusian Order. For the purposes of the photographs, the monks who appear in them were good enough to lay aside for the moment some of their monastic usages in order to conform in full to the Roman rite. Accordingly, for example, in the photographs the lesser ministers wear the surplice instead of the amice, alb and girdle, which is the monastic practice; the Deacon and Subdeacon kneel for the blessing, instead of merely bowing, as solemnly professed monks do in their monastery. It will be noticed that the monks are wearing the monastic hood with the special type of amice that fits over it; and the Sacred Ministers are clad in vestments which are designed and made at the Abbey by members of the community.

Click on the images for an enlarged view.

Friday, 4 May 2018

Importance Notice :
Commissions for 2018 and 2019

To all readers considering placing commissions for vestments with the Studio :

At present, the Studio is accepting commissions for 2019.

Over the last few months, we have had to disappoint a number of Ordinands who applied to us too late to have vestments made for mid-2018 Ordinations.

Please avoid similar disappointment for 2019 by approaching us without delay to discuss your intentions for vestments.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com


Sunday, 22 April 2018

Maundy Thursday Tenebrae

Saint Bede Studio
Figure 1
High altar and chancel wall of
Saint Thomas Becket's church during  Tenebrae.
Image : Latin Mass Society of Australia.
We are able to share a brief video presentation of the Office of Tenebrae for Maundy Thursday, by courtesy of the Latin Mass Society of Australia.

Read more and view the video at our subsidiary blog Where Heaven and Earth Meet.


Monday, 9 April 2018

On the Feast of the Annunciation



The Studio has completed a set of vestments of the Blessed Virgin Mary for a returning customer, a young priest in the United States. This design we have named Regina Coeli.

The vestments were made from an English ecclesiastical brocade damask. They were ornamented with a damask in peacock blue and silver, outlined with a silver-coloured narrow galloon. The vestments were lined with dupion silk in a shade to match the orphrey.

Greetings to all readers on this Feast of the Annunciation.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com

Tuesday, 3 April 2018

Puginesque dalmatic

The Saint Bede Studio has completed two dalmatics and a cope for a returning customer.  Together, the vestments now comprise a Solemn Mass set in the Gothic Revival style.

The dalmatics (one is shewn adjacent), were sewn from an ivory and straw-coloured ecclesiastical brocade and ornamented with an orphrey in green, gold and red : a unique design of the Saint Bede Studio, based on the work of AWN Pugin.  The vestments were lined in straw-gold taffeta.

Click on the image for an enlarged view.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com




Saturday, 31 March 2018

Paschal Greetings 2018

To all readers of this blog and to customers and friends of the Saint Bede Studio, may many Graces be yours on the Day of our Lord's Resurrection.

In a world full of strife, violence, persecutions, hatred, abuse, etc. - all wrought by man - we look again to the optimistic Christian message that God has overcome Death - and all the awfulness, frailties, discord and disappointments of this earthly life - and loves each and every poor sinner.

Christ is Risen !

Wednesday, 28 March 2018

A Black Cope

The vestment described in this post was commissioned together with a number of other vestments for a Latin Mass Community in Brazil.

The cope is extremely simple, but derived from the Roman style of ornament of the 16th century. A black damask was used for these vestments, ornamented with silver braids and lined in charcoal-grey taffeta.

Please click on the image for an enlarged view.

Saturday, 24 March 2018

Red dalmatic for Passiontide

As Holy Week begins, we are pleased to present this red dalmatic, made for a returning customer, and part of a Solemn Mass set.

This vestment, one of two dalmatics, was made from a beautiful European silk damask, being a replica of a Venetian design of the 16th century. It is lined in a bronze taffeta. The vestments are ornamented in the traditional manner with clavi and an apparel upon the chest in colours of burgundy and gold.

Click on the image for an enlarged view.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com

Tuesday, 20 March 2018

Holy Week and Easter Notice

During Holy Week and the Easter Octave, the office of the Saint Bede Studio will be closed.  If you are about to place an order or discuss a commission, please contact us without delay.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com

Saturday, 17 March 2018

Priestly Ordinations 2017 : 7

Figure 1.
Father Hew after offering Mass at the
Church of the Blessed Sacrament,
Clifton Gardens (Sydney).
Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for priestly Ordinands. Happily, 2017 was no exception. It is always a particular pleasure for us to make vestments for Australian ordinands.

In this post, we are pleased to draw attention to the ordination of Father Sebastian Hew of the Archdiocese of Sydney (Australia).  Father Hew was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood in Saint Mary's Cathedral on 24th August by the Archbishop of Sydney, the Most Rev'd Anthony Fisher OP, along with another ordinand.

Father Hew commissioned a set of red vestments from the Studio in the Borromeon style.


The vestments were made from a silk damask in ruby-red.  The ornament, in the Roman style, was formed from a brocade in colours of burgundy and gold, outlined with a galloon in the same colours. The vestments were lined in a burgundy-coloured taffeta, matching the colour of the orphrey.

Please pray for Father Hew and for all newly-ordained priests.

We are pleased to include in this post a photograph taken during the Ordination Mass of Father Hew, in addition to another photograph kindly supplied to us by Father Hew.  


Figure 2
Father Hew during the Mass of Ordination in
Saint Mary's Cathedral, Sydney.
Image : Giovanni Portelli.

Click on the images for an enlarged view.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com

Saturday, 10 March 2018

Laetare Sunday 2018

Rose vestmentsTwice a year, the Church breaks the tone of its penitential seasons by the use of rose-coloured vestments.  Rose-coloured vestments were never commonplace and they still are not.  Many different colours have been deemed by the Church as acceptable as liturgical rose.  Some of these are a salmon shade; some a silvery-pink, almost mushroom-colour; some close to what we would call Bishop's purple or fuchsia; and some red with overtones of gold.


We are pleased to feature this chasuble set, named Rosa Mystica, made for a returning customer in the United States. The vestments are made from dupion silk and lined in silver taffeta. The orphrey of this chasuble is formed from a floriated braid in the early Mediaeval style.

Click on the image for an enlarged view.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com

Saturday, 3 March 2018

Lenten Vestments : 1

Purple vestments
The Saint Bede Studio recently completed a set of vestments for a young priest of the Diocese of Steubenville (Ohio), USA, a returning customer.

These were vestments in the Saint Martin style: very ample.  The vestments were made from a purple ecclesiastical brocade and lined in a deep red shade of taffeta. They are ornamented with a narrow braid in colours of Royal Blue, red, gold and white of the Studio's own design. The distinctive arrangement of the braids is derived from the chasuble of Saint Thomas Becket at Sens Cathedral.

Click on the images for an enlarged view.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com

Friday, 23 February 2018

Saint Giles Gothic Revival Vestments

The Studio recently completed this set of Festal vestments which forms part of a benefactor's donation to the Church of Saint Thomas of Canterbury, Lewisham (Archdiocese of Sydney).  This historic church is undergoing a comprehensive restoration and refurbishment.

These attractive vestments were made from a lovely silk damask of a very muted shade - platinum - and were lined in a  red-coloured taffeta. The chasuble is in the Studio's Saint Giles style, being a contemporary refinement of the Gothic Revival style.

The simple ornament is formed from one of the braids designed by the Studio, in colours of gold upon red.  The braid is directly based on work of AWN Pugin.

Click on the image for an enlarged view.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com

Wednesday, 21 February 2018

Concerning the Shades of Violet

Two shades of "violet".
Often is read here and there vigorous assertions about the "correct" colour of vestments to be used during Lent and Advent. If you have wondered what colour the Church recommends for these Seasons, you may find these posts on our Blog ( here and here) illuminating.

The adjacent photograph depicts two different shades of the colour "violet".  Violet is a blue-tinged colour: it is quite distinct from the colour purple, a shade of which is used as the choir dress for bishops and lesser prelates.

The darker of the two shades is close to that colour described as indigo.

Tuesday, 13 February 2018

As Lent Begins

As Lent approaches, we are pleased to feature this set of vestments made by the Studio and recently purchased by a priest of the Diocese of Clifton UK.

The vestments were made from silk dupion according to our Saint Giles design. The chasuble is unlined, but has a facing on the underside of the neckline to give a neat and substantial finish to the opening.

These vestments are in a rich shade of purple. The ornament is formed from an orphrey braid designed by the Saint Bede Studio, being inspired by Celtic and Carolingian art. The colours of the braid are burgundy, gold and white upon a red base.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com 

Click on the images for an enlarged view.





Friday, 9 February 2018

Priestly Ordinations 2017 : 6

Borromeon vestments
Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for priestly Ordinands. Happily, 2017 was no exception.

In this post, we are pleased to draw attention to the ordination of Father Konrad Gagatek of the Archdiocese of Perth (Australia).  Father Gagatek was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood in Saint Mary's Cathedral on 17th November by the Archbishop of Perth, the Most Rev'd Timothy Costelloe SDB, along with five other ordinands.

Father Gagatek commissioned a set of Marian vestments from the Studio in the Borromeon style. This design we have named Regina Coeli.


The vestments were made from a brocade in a bright white.  The ornament, in the Roman style, was formed from a damask in colours of Peacock Blue and silver, outlined with a galloon also in silver. The vestments were lined in a blue taffeta, matching the colour of the orphrey.

Please pray for Father Gagatek and for all newly-ordained priests.

We are pleased to include in this post a photograph taken during the Ordination Mass of Father Gagatek.  

Click on the images for an enlarged view.


Father Konrad Gagatek (2nd from the right)
during the celebration of the Mass of Ordination.

Image: Archdiocese of Perth.

Sunday, 4 February 2018

To What End Sacred Vestments?

Solemn Mass at the Abbey of 
Saint Madeleine, Le Barroux.
If we were to accept the notion that a priest is the "president of the christian assembly" then what he wears to celebrate the Sacred Liturgy would be merely an expression of his personality or tastes. The notion of presider is an entirely modern (and an execrable) concept. A priest, bishop or Pope celebrates the Sacred Mysteries. In the East, the term used is to serve.

Because the celebrant is least of all a "presider", what he wears should not essentially be about his own preferences and personality. A priest should ask of himself :

Is what I am wearing worthy of my ministry standing between God and man to offer the Holy Sacrifice?

Will what I am wearing draw those who look upon me during Mass into a closer appreciation of the Sacred Mysteries, in other words, will it raise their hearts and minds to God?

Or will it act as a distraction to the Faithful attending Mass?

Friday, 26 January 2018

Vestments of the Blessed Virgin

For today's post, we are pleased to describe this Marian chasuble,  Ave Maris Stella,  made for an English priest.  This is a chasuble in the Gothic Revival style.

The decorative focus of this vestment is an orphrey braid which is based on the work of AWN Pugin.  This braid is produced in two shades of blue (lighter and darker) with figured ornament in gold.

These vestments were made from an ecclesiastical damask in the shade of ivory and lined in a Royal Blue taffeta.

Click on the images for an enlarged view.

Enquiries: stbede62@gmail.com

Thursday, 11 January 2018

Restoration works in Saint Thomas' church, Lewisham

Following on from our post on the Feast of Saint Thomas Becket, we are pleased to include these two photographs taken before and after the major interior redecoration of the church of Saint Thomas of Canterbury in Lewisham (NSW), undertaken in collaboration with The Saint Bede Studio

Read more ... 

Please click on the images for enlarged view.

BEFORE
(April 2017)
Catholic Church Lewisham
Copyright of the Saint Bede Studio


AFTER
(December 2017)
Catholic Church Lewisham
Copyright of Mulholland Restoration and Decorating.

Saturday, 6 January 2018

Important Notice :
Commissions with the Studio for 2018

An important reminder to all those considering placing an order for vestments with the Studio.  Our schedule for 2018 now has fewer and fewer available places.  

Do not delay in making contact with us and finalising your arrangements.


Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com 

Thursday, 4 January 2018

Priestly Ordinations 2017 : 5

Figure 1.
Father Elson pictured with his bishop
after Ordination.
Each year, the Saint Bede Studio has the privilege of preparing sacred vestments for priestly Ordinands. Happily, 2017 was no exception.

In this post, we are pleased to draw attention to the ordination of Father Richard Elson of Oscott College (UK).  Father Elson was ordained to the Sacred Priesthood in the Cathedral of Saint Peter and Paul on 9th December by the Bishop of Clifton, the Right Rev'd Declan Lang.

Father Elson commissioned a set of festal vestments from the Studio in the Gothic Revival style.


The vestments were made from an English ecclesiastical brocade in a shade of ivory and ornamented with a braid in colours of red, burgundy and straw-gold of the Studio's own design. The vestments were lined in muted yellow taffeta.

Please pray for Father Elson and for all newly-ordained priests.

We are pleased to include in this post, photographs provided by Father Elson.  These and other photographs may be found at the Flickr website .

Click on the images for an enlarged view.


Figure 2.
Father Elson receives the sacred vessels
during the Rite of Ordination.



Figure 3.
Father Elson's hands are anointed during the Rite of Ordination.



Figure 4.
Father Elson during the Canon of the Mass.


Figure 5.
Father Elson gave his first priestly blessings to
the Faithful following the Ordination Mass.

Tuesday, 2 January 2018

Papal Retrospective : Blessed Paul VI

Pope Paul VI
Pope Paul wearing The Four Evangelists mitre.

One of the admirable pieces of Liturgical art produced during the reign of Pope Paul VI was the well-known mitre shewn in the above photograph. This mitre was especially designed and made for Pope Paul by artisans in the Archdiocese of Milan. Ornamented with embroideries of the Four Evangelists, the mitre is also remarkable for its couched gold thread, running in parallel circles (you can see this in the photograph below). The highest workmanship is evident in this mitre and it is of excellent proportion.

In fact, there were several such mitres. One had silver ornament, the other gold. One was left in Australia after the Papal Visit of 1970: that particular mitre is shewn in the photograph below.


Pope Paul VI
Pope Paul in S' Mary's Cathedral, Sydney, November 1970.

After 1966, Pope Paul usually wore this mitre, such that it became identifiable with him. There was, however, an earlier iteration of this mitre, which was used by Pope Paul on his famous visit to New York in 1965. It is shewn below. The emblems of the Four Evangelists are less elaborately worked on the earlier version.


Pope Paul VI
Pope Paul during the Papal Visit to New York, 1965.

In 1965, Pope Paul introduced a Pastoral Staff for the celebration of the Papal Liturgies, which he used in the manner of a crozier.  This staff was designed by Italian sculptor Lello Scorzelli.  It was used for the first time at the closing of the Second Vatican Council, on 8th December 1965.  This staff is now well-known since it was used almost invariably by Saint John Paul II throughout his Pontificate and, for a short time, by Pope Benedict. It is frequently used by the present Bishop of Rome.

Looking at the three photographs above, something else is noticeable. Each of the Pastoral Staffs being used is different, although stylistically similar. Yet another staff is shewn in the photograph below, which was the one subsequently used by Pope John Paul II.


Pope Paul VI
Pope Paul pictured in 1978.

The Four Evangelists mitre had a predecessor which was used briefly by Pope Paul during the years 1965 -1967 and which is sometimes referred to as The Vatican Two mitre.  Some images of it are reproduced below.


Pope Paul VI
At the close of the Second Vatican Council, 1965.


Pope Paul VI
In S' Peter's, 1965.

It is likely that information exists somewhere as to the origins of the design of this mitre.  This much can be claimed: it certainly was intended as some sort of alternative to the triple tiara of Pope Paul VI, which he gave away as alms for the poor.  It has also been suggested that it may represent the triple-barred Cross often associated with the Papacy.  Such Crosses actually do exist in the Vatican (not just in the hands of a statue).  The decoration of this mitre features four lyrebirds around the crown section.


Pope Paul VI
Triple tiara of Pope Paul VI.

Something more may be written about this, which is subject to verification.  An author in the field of Ecclesiastical heraldry and protocol, Dr James-Charles Noonan claimed in an interview in 2005 that The Vatican Two mitre (which ceased being used in 1967) was bequeathed by Pope Paul to Josef Cardinal Ratzinger, who possesses it to this day.  *  Dr Noonan claimed that The Vatican Two mitre was the direct inspiration for the Coat of Arms of Pope Benedict XVI (shewn below).  If this is true, then it seems rather odd that of all the many mitres worn by Pope Benedict during his Pontificate the two he NEVER wore were The Four Evangelists mitre and The Vatican Two mitre.  We can only assume that it was the choice of the Pope not to do so.


Coat of Arms of Pope Benedict XVI.
We may be grateful that no attempt was made by
Pope Benedict to wear a mitre which resembled the one depicted on his Arms.


* If any reader might have further information about the mitre in question, the writer of this post would be very pleased to hear from him.

Enquiries : stbede62@gmail.com